Skerry


(Click to enlarge)

As a small child I used to draw a picture of an island – or rather skerry – with a tree on it over and over, many times. Probably inspired by the Finnish archipelago that I watched from the ferry to Finland every summer when we went to visit the grandparents. Maybe it was the same thing that Arnold Böcklin had with his Isle of the Dead.
I was curious to see how I would draw it today.

Happy International Women’s Day!

I drew the title illustration for this year’s special March 8th issue of Graswurzelrevolution. The lettering on the front banner is by Tine Fetz!

My contributions to the Bilderberg Konferenz V book

Okay, so I guess it figures that the first comic page I draw in a very long time is going to be an entirely self-indulgent thing with piggies and ultra-violence directed at men, in general. This is for the collaboration book for the Bilderberg Konferenz V underground comics festival in Berlin, August 10-11th.


(Larger view)

We always do our own weird take on some topic, and this year the theme is the forgotten and unfinished play “Hanswurst’s Wedding” by Goethe, which seems to be some kind of satire about how disgusting upper class people are etc. In the Bilderberg books it’s even worse, of course, while we tried to creatively include the original text fragments. That also means that the book has to be in German.

The story is basically just that the upper class twit Hanswurst is getting married and the wedding party is just an orgy of all kinds of revolting stuff, while his dad praises him above all heavens.

Goethe never finished the play so we don’t know how it was supposed to end, but this is how I think it should end! A band of women guerillas crash the party and kill everyone (especially/at least the men) in the name of revolutionary expropriation.

The final line is inspired by gothhabiba. And the first slogans they are shouting are inspired by L.D. Bronstein, On Optimism and Pessimism: On the Twentieth Century and on Many Other Issues (1901). Full context:

It seems as if the new century, this gigantic newcomer, were bent at the very moment of its appearance to drive the optimist into absolute pessimism and civic nirvana.
– Death to Utopia! Death to faith! Death to love! Death to hope! thunders the twentieth century in salvos of fire and in the rumbling of guns.
– Surrender, you pathetic dreamer. Here I am, your long awaited twentieth century, your ‘future’.
– No, replies the unhumbled optimist: You – you are only the present.

We also drew bizarre portraits of the wedding guests in Basil Wolverton style (or just our own style). Here are mine:


Goethe’s name of the character is Saufaus, which means “drunkard”, but if you add a “t” at the end it becomes “fist of the sow”! So I figured the character is a martial artist who has “Saufaust”/”Fist of the Sow” tattooed on her arm, and scars from an injury have obscured the “t” at the end …


And I thought the character named “Schweinpelz” (“Pig fur”) should just be a very furry boar. V^(oo)^V

HOURLY COMICS DAY 2019

Read it behind the cut!

I KNOW WHAT I DID LAST SUMMER

Many people go through their lives and never build a shed. I am not one of those people.

I tragically had to give up my beloved DDR Trailer Trash garden, but early this summer I got another garden by a stroke of luck. It has a perfectly normal little house on it, in a bit of disrepair, but still quite bourgeois even, with fancy things like electricity and running cold water. The garden is big and has lots of potential, and it’s right next to a small river.
This first summer and autumn I’ve been planting lots of new trees and shrubs and fighting the extreme heat and drought. And also I built a shed with a workshop/toolshed and a compost toilet, which is what this post is all about!

Behind the house there was already a concrete foundation, probably from an old shed that was torn down at some point. There was also a stash of used lumber, and other trash laying around, such as windows and rain gutters. So I didn’t have to make a new foundation, and I only had to buy part of the building materials.

I’d done some repairs and built some smaller things, but I’d never built anything near a whole shed before. Basically I learned everything from the Internet, reading many different, good and bad, tutorials, while deciding on a design. (Special thanks to theoblackadder for his instructables, showing how to build pretty advanced stuff all on your own.)
Since I didn’t have electricity in my old garden, I’d only used hand powered tools before, but now I got an electric drill/screwdriver, which was a very good thing to have for this project, where thousands of screws were drilled! I almost killed myself with the sawing, though.

 

For starters, I sawed the huge 10×10 cm corner posts and the bottom and top beams for the side walls to the correct length. This is where I almost killed myself, sawing seven pieces of that dense, thick wood with a mere handsaw. One day I almost gave up, but then my neighbour invited me for coffee, and soon after getting all jacked up on his coffee I had somehow finished all the beams. Then I painted them.

(Continue reading …)

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